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Category: "news"

Taxi for Uber! – Part 2

Taxi for Uber! – Part 2

It’s been almost a year since we reported on the Employment Tribunal case brought by a number of Uber drivers, who successfully argued that they were ‘workers’ (as opposed to self-employed contractors) and therefore entitled to rights such as the right to be paid the National Minimum... read more »

Going mobile – what you need to know about mobility clauses

Going mobile – what you need to know about mobility clauses

Mobility clauses are often a standard part of contracts of employment. They generally say that an employer can require an employee to work at a different location on a temporary or permanent basis, and will usually specify a geographical area to which the clause applies. I am sure you... read more »

The new right to parental bereavement leave – what you need to know

The new right to parental bereavement leave – what you need to know

Currently, when an employee suffers a bereavement the only statutory right is to unpaid time off for dependents, which is limited to ‘reasonable’ time off for emergencies relating to dependents and making arrangements following a death. As I have written about previously here, although most employers do... read more »

Exhibit A: the importance of evidence in disciplinary proceedings

Exhibit A: the importance of evidence in disciplinary proceedings

We consider two recent tales from the Tribunal, which highlight important issues around evidence when taking employees through a disciplinary procedure. Vorajee v Royal Mail Group Limited (2017)  Mr Vorajee booked a flight to Mumbai, with the intention of booking time off work at short notice. However, his wife had... read more »

New teeth for HMRC – offence of failure to prevent the facilitation of tax evasion

New teeth for HMRC – offence of failure to prevent the facilitation of tax evasion

The Criminal Finance Act 2017 has created a new corporate offence of failing to prevent the facilitation of tax evasion. The new offence means that companies can be prosecuted if they have failed to prevent tax evasion in the UK, and anywhere else in the world, committed by an... read more »

Every little helps - or does it?

Every little helps - or does it?

It’s pretty obvious really, but if an employee is dismissed and feels that they have been treated unjustly, they are likely to feel bitter towards their former employer. For those who have the required 2 years’ service to bring a claim for unfair dismissal, they potentially have a remedy through... read more »

The risks of suspending an employee

The risks of suspending an employee

When disciplinary allegations come to light against an employee, sometimes it becomes necessary for an employer to consider whether they should suspend the employee whilst an investigation is undertaken. As our previous articles (here and here) have stressed, suspending an employee is not something to... read more »

Watch your words – the risk of age discrimination

Watch your words – the risk of age discrimination

The concept of age discrimination has been with us since 2006, and despite the fears expressed by some when it was introduced, claims relating to ageist comments have been relatively few in number. However, the fact that claims in respect of ageist comments are relatively rare does not mean that... read more »

Big bother - the latest on employee monitoring

Big bother - the latest on employee monitoring

Back in January 2016, we reported on the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) case Barbulescu v Romania, and what it meant for employee monitoring in the workplace. That decision has now been reversed by a higher chamber of the ECHR. Recap: Mr Barbulescu Mr Barbulescu, a sales engineer... read more »

Tribunal time limits to double?

Tribunal time limits to double?

In comparison to other types of legal claim, most Employment Tribunal time limits are very short. For example, in the civil courts the limitation period is six years for a breach of contract claim, yet in the Employment Tribunal the equivalent time limit would be three months. I have dealt... read more »

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