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Headline news – no more Tribunal fees

Headline news – no more Tribunal fees

28 July 2017 by Nicola Brown

If you have been reading the news this week, you can’t have missed that one of the most important cases affecting employment law has finally been decided by the Supreme Court after many years of litigation. Employment Tribunal fees have been found to be unlawful and can no longer be charged. The case... read more »

The Taylor review – tailored to the gig economy?

The Taylor review – tailored to the gig economy?

26 July 2017 by Anna Rabone

The long-anticipated Taylor review of modern employment practices was published on 11 July 2017. The review, led by Matthew Taylor (chief executive of the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce), calls for a “significant shift in the quality of work in the UK economy” and has made... read more »

Whistleblowing update

Whistleblowing update

28 July 2017 by Marianne Wright

As we have covered in previous articles, employees who do not have sufficient length of service to claim unfair dismissal sometimes try to bring a whistleblowing claim, as there is no minimum length of service required, and no cap on the amount of compensation that can be awarded by the Employment Tribunal if the... read more »

Humour in the office – some cautionary tales

Humour in the office – some cautionary tales

26 July 2017 by Peter Stevens

Many of us spend a good part of our waking time at work, and most people would recognise that a work place with no humour would be a sad place to be. In addition, a recent study by academics at Yale University concluded that a worker or boss who successfully uses... read more »

FAQs: the right to be accompanied

FAQs: the right to be accompanied

26 July 2017 by Anna Rabone

Employees and workers have a legal right to be accompanied by a trade union representative or colleague at a disciplinary or grievance hearing. This right is set out in section 10 of the Employment Relations Act 1999. This may strike you as quite straightforward, but actually employers can face many difficulties with regard to the... read more »